We Have A Match

AncestryDNA has been insanely efficient with churning out results of late. I sent away Bio Granddad’s first cousin’s (we will call her H!) DNA sample on the 6th of August and the results came through yesterday (the 24th of August)! I am so glad, as the incessant checking of our DNA homepages was getting distracting….

Week 45: Bearded/52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

The McLeod ancestors had some pretty awesome beards going on…but I have written about them previously and have done no further research on them just yet. I have, however been doing some research on other McLeod descendants who seemed to have sported rather neat, 19th century/early 20th century standard moustaches. These portraits are from my…

Connections

I received an email from a girl a few months ago, regarding a post I had made about the Wilson brothers (my 1st cousins 3x removed) and their involvement in the Battle of Fromelles in 1916. Eric and Sam Wilson’s bodies were only formally identified and properly buried in July 2010. It was pretty incredible…

Week 44: Frightening/52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

I couldn’t go past an anecdote I came across regarding my biological fourth great uncle, Edward Saxby for this theme. Edward, known as Ned to his friends and family, was born in 1833 and died in 1917 in Barrington, New South Wales. …though it seems the dying part didn’t exactly take the first time around….

Week 43: Cause of Death/52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

Mary Anna/Hannah Valentine and Stephen Sylvester Stevens (yep, that is his actual name) my biological fourth great grandparents must have found the year 1861 very difficult. That year saw them lose three of their children, aged five years, three years and twelve months old. The death of the five year old, my fourth great uncle…

Week 42: Conflict/52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

My biological fourth great uncle, Benjamin Boorer (one of Mum’s biological paternal third great uncles) was a participant in the gold diggings at Hanging Rock in the 1850s. in 1852, he was killed by a fellow digger during a physical altercation in their camp. The papers (The Maitland Mercury/Hunter River General Advisor, 13th November 1852)…

Week 41: Sports/52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

My great great grandfather, George Richard Taplin (biological maternal side) was an amateur boxer. I found this out when I accidentally stumbled across his medals, along with his son, James Alan Taplin’s World War II medals on an auction website: I came across a newspaper article in the Daily Telegraph about the 1st Prize medal…

Week 40: Ten/52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

Robert Hann and Mary Ann “Matilda” Thompson were my fourth great grandparents on my paternal Nan’s side of the family. A convict couple, the two married in Parramatta on the 18th of February, 1835 and went on to have┬áten children,┬ámost of which appear to have been born in the Grafton and surrounding areas of NSW:…

Week 39: On the Farm/52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

My great great grandfather, Solomon John Weller was a dairy farmer in Dyers Crossing. He farmed his property, known as “Glenwood” before moving into Taree, to a smaller property known as “Wellerleigh” to family members and the wider community. There is a bit of confusion as to the location of the initial property I think….

Week 38: Unusual Source/52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks

*So I got to Week 38 before having my momentum interrupted with this challenge. I think I did pretty well considering! Back to it though in the coming weeks.* The Taplin suitcase I came into possession of earlier in the year is a whole collection’s worth of unusual sources. Ranging from photos, letters, newspaper clippings,…

So Who Is He? Part V

This is risky. However, I am running out of ideas. There are challenges inherent in cases of adoption, where dodgy pre-adoption paperwork and the lack of legal recognition where genealogy based DNA research is concerned. It limits one’s options regarding the tracing of a close biological relative. Essentially, because Bio Granddad is not on the…